Jan 08

4 Fitness Classes To Try In 2017

Working out on your own can be lonely, creating the potential to lose interest and motivation over time. Here are four new fitness classes to try this year that are sure to keep you going back for more:

Boxing.

Forget about having to jump in the ring for this full body exercise — many gyms and studios focus on the no-contact style. This intense workout will improve overall fitness through moves that increase your agility, coordination, balance, endurance, speed and power. Be sure to wear clothes that you can jump and lunge in.

Barre.

This ballet-inspired workout is designed to build toned and lean muscles. It features a combination of postures that use a barre to balance while performing small muscle movements with high reps. Prepare for class with toe grip socks and yoga attire, like the Denver Hayes 100 wash yoga legging from Mark’s.

Mixed format.

Try a hybrid format, where multiple workouts are mixed into one class. They usually combine strength training and cardio, making a hybrid one of the most effective ways to burn calories. Make sure to dress appropriately for the types of workouts you will be doing, especially if the styles of exercise are completely different.

Spin. Group cycling is popular for a reason — you ride in a group setting that every fitness level can benefit from. Classes can be offered at your local gym or spin studio. Wear attire that’s best suited for moderate impact.

www.newscanada.com

Jan 01

How to Swim Faster: Step Up the Pace to Improve Your Times

As a former Swimming Coach and Learn to Swim teacher, I am often surprised when I hear about swimmers that have spent months and even years in a swimming training rut. Each week they diligently attend their hour or hour and a half long swim sessions swimming laps up and down that black line with no changes to their personal best (PB) swim times. They tend to accept that this is where they are on the swim performance ladder; stagnate, and can’t seem to get any faster.

If you have been swimming training for weeks on end, you will be in relatively good condition and more than ready to try something new. Swimming can be very boring if you let it, but it can also be a lot of fun too. If you have mastered the endurance part of swimming, it is about time for you to start focusing on improving your speed and smash that PB.

Long distance swimmers training for Triathlons or the Half Ironman, listen up because this article applies to you. You’ll be adding some “Fartlek” training to your training repertoire to increase your pace a little whilst also improving the speed at which you recover.

Fartlek is Swiss for “Speed Play”, it sounds fun and it is. Fartlek trains the body to switch gears and recruit different muscle fibres; it is often used by long distance runners to improve running speed, but can just effectively be used by swimmers to improve their times too.

During your laps you will be working at Pace 1 and Pace 2. Pace 1 is a steady long distance maintainable speed, Pace 2 is 50-70% maximum sprint speed, depending on your fitness level. As you get better these two speeds will gradually speed up. There’s four stages to the Fartlek, depending on fitness levels and your commitment, it may take a week or a month to advance through each of the stages.

Stage 1: Start your regular swim session with your usual warm up. The Fartlek session will be 10 laps. Swim half the length of the pool at Pace 1, then sprint the rest of the length of the pool at Pace 2. There’s no stopping when you finish the lap, just tumble-turn and slow down during Pace 1. Pace 1 is recovery, Pace 2 is at speed. You may need to adjust your pace so you can finish the entire 10 laps. At this stage burn-out halfway through the session is not the goal.

Incorporate Fartlek into your training at least three times a week on alternate days.

Stage 2: When you are ready, move onto doing 10 laps Fartlek training alternating each lap at Pace 1 followed by a lap at Pace 2. Remember, no stopping at the end of each lap.

Stage 3: Now you should be ready to alternate Pace 1 and Pace 2 for 10 laps, but with Pace 2 at maximum speed. It should burn and you should be breathless during recovery at Pace 1. If you’re not feeling it, push harder.

Stage 4: Really ramp things up by changing the recovery verses speed ratio. Aim for 12 laps, but we now swim one lap at Pace 1 followed immediately by two laps at Pace 2.

Essentially, what you have trained your body to do, is to swim at a faster pace for a longer distance, you’re also training your body to recover in the water whilst you continue swimming. Remember to time yourself as you progress through each stage, stay accountable and keep improving.

 

http://www.facebook.com/SwimmingForFitness

Article Source: EzineArticles.com

Jan 01

Getting Back Into The Pool: How To Get Into Condition

There are numerous reasons for taking the plunge and starting a Swimming Training regime. When getting back into the pool, you will have two major hurdles to overcome before you can complete your first ‘K’ without stopping.

Addressing the ‘mental’ hurdle of making yourself start a new regime and sticking-to-it is going to be totally up to you. It is only once you get back into the water you’ll be very aware of the next hurdle, and that is Lactic Acid. If you have ever jumped into the pool after a long absence from the water or never swum laps before, you will very quickly learn all about your Lactic Acid threshold.

Fear not, as I will guide you through building up your Lactate tolerance by use of Conditioning Training.

Conditioning Training or continuous exercise training is a long steady exercise regime of 20 minutes or more, without rest periods. Unlike training to run long distance; where you can alternate between walking, jogging and running; approaching a long distance swim is different.

There are two approaches to swimming 1K without stopping. The first approach is to get into the pool and force yourself to finish the 20 laps (Olympic size pool), non-stop and bear the pain. I find this “no pain, no gain” approach to be very painful, and from my own experience pain does not equate to an enjoyable experience. I have found that if one enjoys an experience and can set small achievable goals, they are more likely to repeat the experience.

My approach to completing a 1k swim nonstop is going to be incremental. As with most Aerobic training exercises the intensity stays constant and does not increase to a higher level (the energy output would cause the body to fatigue quickly). Instead, we’re aiming to steadily increase our overall distance and build up our resistance to Lactic Acid (that burning sensation you feel when you swim and you are not in Condition). Lactic Acid fatigues and inhibits performance. Each training session will increase the swimmer’s Lactic Acid threshold. As the number of laps swum increases the swimmer can train to better tolerate lactate and increase their lactate threshold, the end result is an ongoing improvement in performance.

When you start this training regime you’ll be aiming for 20 laps, at least three times a week. Experienced swimmers can take as little as two weeks to get into Condition, after which they can swim any number of laps without having to stop. As a beginner, we’d need to be more realistic and set a goal of one to three months. Each stage of the training schedule is at your own pace. Remember, if you don’t enjoy it you’ll be less likely to stay with it. Also, goals should be achievable, pliable and accountable.

Equipment: You’ll need the usual pool attire such as a swimming cap to keep your hair out of your face and creating drag, goggles to keep your eyes from going red and so you can see other swimmers, a water bottle to ensure you stay hydrated, a kickboard and a pair of fins (flippers). I prefer to start off wearing fins because they give you the correct buoyancy, they’ll help you stay in the water longer and, if you are like me and have only a two beat kick, they’ll get you using your legs more because it is your arms that will be doing most of the work, so they will help with fatigue.

Tip: Long fins are easier to swim in than short fins. If you want to train yourself out of relying on your fins, be prepared to cut them an inch shorter each week so you become less reliant on them.

Stage One: Swim one lap of the pool, rest 30 seconds at the end. Swim second lap of the pool, rest 30 seconds at the end. Repeat until you have completed 6 laps, resting 30 seconds after each lap. The 30 second rest is required to assist muscle and respiratory recovery. The second part of stage one includes 6 laps of nonstop kick using a kickboard; mix it up to include breaststroke, backstroke and freestyle kick. Kick will get you using different muscles, assist with buoyancy and give your arms a rest. The third part of stage one is 2 laps of freestyle stopping 30 seconds at each end, 2 laps of backstroke stopping 30 seconds at each end, finished with 2 laps of breaststroke stopping 30 seconds at each end.

Tip: Remove fins when doing breaststroke. If you can breaststroke wearing a pair of fins you aren’t doing it correctly.

Stage Two: When you are ready, move onto doing the same routine as outlined in stage one, except this time you’re swimming two laps at a time (100mtr) then having your 30 second break. That is, three sets of 2 laps with a 30 second break between each set, making a total of 6 laps, followed by 8 laps of kick, finishing with three sets of 2 laps freestyle, backstroke and breaststroke.

Stage Three: This stage will include pushing through the pain barrier a little. Commit to finishing all 6 laps nonstop. Rest one minute, followed by 8 laps kick, finishing with 6 laps nonstop (except to remove those fins) freestyle, backstroke and breaststroke.

Stage Four: Aim for 8 laps nonstop, followed by 6 laps kick, finished with 6 laps nonstop.

Stage Five: 10 Laps nonstop, 4 laps kick, finished with 6 laps nonstop

Stage Six: 12 Laps nonstop, 4 laps kick, finished with 4 laps nonstop.

Last stage: 20 Laps nonstop.

Well done, if you can complete all seven stages in an Olympic size pool you would have completed a full 1K swim.

 

http://www.facebook.com/SwimmingForFitness

Article Source: EzineArticles.com

Dec 31

Weighing Me Down: The Judgement Associated with Obesity

After years of yo-yo dieting, self-judgement and shame, Amanda had enough.

She began struggling with her weight in her teen years, and through her 20’s, she tried diet after diet, elite gym memberships and personal trainers. ‘I’ll start on Monday’ became somewhat of a life motto.

Amanda felt like she finally caught a break when she met Dr. Sean Wharton of the Wharton Medical Clinic, a Toronto-based internal medicine specialist focused on obesity management.

“Dr. Wharton explained that my physiological wiring is what makes weight loss so difficult,” said Amanda. “I feel relieved to know that there is an explanation for why all the work and energy I have put into weight loss seems, at times, to be for nothing.”

Though Amanda and Dr. Wharton have developed a treatment plan to manage her obesity, now classified as a chronic disease by the Canadian Medical Association, her friends and family still do not understand.

“They often send me information about new fitness classes, or ask if I want to grab a salad, as if I’m not capable of knowing how to eat healthy when I go out,” says Amanda. “Their attempt at being supportive, to me, sounds like they would love me more if I were thinner. I’m happy with myself and my body; I just wish those around me could get on the same page.”

A Leger survey found that 86 per cent of Canadians believe that personal choices about physical activity and food intake is a leading cause of obesity. The survey also found that 55 per cent of Canadians believe that people who have obesity lack self-discipline.

These sentiments could not be further from the truth, as research has identified a number of obesity risk factors including genetics, physical activity, diet, socioeconomic status, ethnicity, immigration and environmental factors.

If you’re living with obesity, contact your doctor to discuss an individual treatment plan that offers realistic and sustainable strategies to ensure successful chronic weight loss and management.

www.newscanada.com

Dec 31

Work Out To Strengthen Your Immune System

Modern life can get in the way of our fitness goals, but even a little bit of exercise can go a long way in boosting your immune system. Did you know that engaging in just 30 to 60 minutes of moderate exercise daily can actually improve your body’s immune response?

An often overlooked but important part of maintaining a healthy immune system, exercise helps flush out bacteria from your lungs and airways, improves circulation, causes mild fluctuations in body temperature to fight infection, and releases stress-reducing endorphins. In fact, even a daily brisk walk can cut your number of sick days by more than half.

Give your workouts a boost by adding some natural health support. Here are some suggestions from Michelle W. Book, a holistic nutritionist for the Canadian Health Food Association:

Krill oil:

When coupled with exercise, krill oil supplementation can help increase white blood cell production, which helps sustain immune function.

Protein:

Branched-chain amino acids are the building blocks of protein. They help improve muscle recovery after exercise and immune cell growth and development.

Vitamin D:

Vitamin D supplementation in athletes has been shown to limit infections. If you’re engaging in winter sports or plan to hit the gym hard, consider adding this vitamin for immune health and overall well-being.

Echinacea:

This herbal supplement has been shown to improve the immune function of high-intensity and endurance athletes, such as marathoners and triathletes. It can also decrease the number of chest colds you may experience.

Learn more about how you can naturally boost your immune system and find a local CHFA Member health food store online at chfa.ca.

www.newscanada.com

Dec 30

5 Tips To Get Fit And Stay Fit

(BPT) – To lose weight and/or get in better shape consistently ranks as one of the top New Year’s resolutions. However, many resolutions to reach this goal fall short or last less than a month because a great idea is seldom successful without a plan to make it happen.

If you’ve tried and failed to get in shape or lose weight as part of a New Year’s resolution, it’s time to put a plan behind your passion. Below are five tips from BiPro’s 31 Ways in 31 Days challenge. They are appropriate for all ages and fitness levels, so use them to start your own wellness resolution, whether it’s on Jan. 1, March 1 or whenever you’re ready to make a healthy change.

* Measure your success. Minneapolis fitness expert Chris Freytag says celebrating those small victories will keep you motivated to pursue your final goal, and there are ways to measure your results beyond stepping on the scale. She recommends keeping a workout journal to record improvements in your weight training, biking or running. Record each session in detail so you can review them later and see how your numbers have progressed. It’s the perfect pick-me-up.

* Balance your protein intake throughout the day. Most Americans consume barely any protein in the morning, a fair amount for lunch and a lot with dinner. For the best results, you should try to balance your protein intake throughout the day. That way, your body has a constant stream of the nutrients it needs to function at its best. You can estimate how much protein you need each day using the protein calculator at BiProUSA.com. Once you’ve found your number, be sure you’re consuming a steady and balanced portion of protein not only at dinner, but also at breakfast and lunch.

* Get motivated to work out even when you don’t feel like exercising. Sometimes you just don’t want to work out, but instead of putting it off until tomorrow, Jordan Hasay, a record setting professional runner, says it’s important to set small daily goals. “It’s all about winning the day,” she says. “As a professional athlete, my workouts every day are difficult. It’s all about taking baby steps and really looking at one step at a time and setting individual goals for the day.”

* Don’t let a pre-existing injury postpone your workout. After a decade of playing pro football, Ben Leber had trouble running without pain due to his worn-down knees. So he took up boxing, as his twice-per-week cardio workout. The sport is physical and gets Leber’s heart rate up, all without putting unneeded pressure on his knees. Find the sport that appeals to you. Be it boxing, swimming or bike riding, there is a solution out there that works for you and your existing injury.

* Start the day with a protein-packed breakfast. You know starting the day with protein is important, but your busy schedule means cooking eggs and bacon every morning isn’t possible. Instead, start your morning with a protein smoothie using this recipe:

– 1 scoop unflavored protein powder

– 1 cup strawberries

– 1/2 banana

– 1 cup almond milk

Blend them all together until they are thoroughly mixed and load them in your travel mug. You’ll have a great healthy breakfast to start your day.

While Jan. 1 is a popular day to kick off a health and fitness goal, any day of the year can mark the start of your new life, you just have to set a plan and follow through. So don’t delay. The better you is out there, so seize it before the new year rolls around again. To find more tips from the 31 Ways in 31 Days challenge, as well as other healthy recipes, visit BiProUSA.com.

Dec 05

A Little Bit of Yoga Stretches To Keep Things Moving While Working at the Computer

OK, not everyone gets to sit at their computer in New Zealand close to the ocean but sitting is sitting. So to counteract all that sitting at the computer which makes our mental function feel good about accomplishing cognitive stuff, we still have to take care of the poor old body – the physical function. Doing a few stretches can go a long way to keeping the body flexible, keeping the circulation moving, and keeping the mind from getting overtaxed with too much data.

Here are a few stretches to keep your body from stagnating while working at your computer. We will start with the head and work towards the feet. Take your time and follow your own rhythm. What I have here are simple guidelines but only do what is comfortable for you; if it does not feel right, do not do it.

  1. Head 1: Let’s begin by coming to an exhalation and while exhaling, lower your chin toward the chest. Follow this with an inhalation while lifting the chin upward. Repeat this movement 3 times. Return the chin back to its normal position parallel with the floor.
  1. Head 2: Next, exhale and turn your head slowly to the left. Inhale again and then exhale once again while turning your head slowly toward the right. Use the breath to create your movements and rhythms. Complete this movement 3 times.
  1. Shoulders: Inhale and lift the shoulders up to the ear lobes. Hold the breath for a count of 5, exhale and drop the shoulders. Repeat 3 times.
  1. Arms 1: Inhale and raise the right wrist upwards towards the ceiling – let it just float up and once it is as high as it wants to go, open the fingers and palms and reach up from the shoulder joint. Hold for a count of 5 and slowly lower the wrist back to your starting point.
  1. Arms 2: Exhale as you grab your left shoulder with your right hand. Next, with your left hand, push up on your right elbow slightly. Hold to a count of 5 and inhale, relax.
  1. Torso Twist: Maintaining the position in #5, exhaling while you turn the upper half of your body towards the right to look behind you. You can create more of a stretch by either placing your left hand on your right knee or over the arm of the your chair while twisting the torso to the right and looking over your right shoulder. Hold for 5 seconds. Inhale, release. REPEAT ON LEFT SIDE.
  1. Forward Bend Chest Press: Move away from your desk slightly to prevent banging your head on your desk which would reduce the benefit of stretching (sorry) and exhale as you draw in your chin and slowly bend your chest towards your knees bending forward while walking both of your hands down the front of our legs towards your feet or ankles. Hold the breath for 5 seconds. Then coming to an inhalation, keep your chin tucked in as you slowly straighten one link of the spine at a time returning to normal sitting position.
  1. Knee to Chest Press: Grab your right knee with both hands and pull it towards your chest. Hug it to your chest as you exhale. Hold for 5 seconds and then inhale, release by slowly crossing the foot over the opposite knee. Once again do a torso twist to the right. Hold for a count of 5 and then lower the foot to the floor. REPEAT OPPOSITE SIDE.
  1. Feet 1: With your feet flat to the floor, point your toes towards the ceiling. Hold for 5 seconds and lower feet back to the floor. Lift heels off the floor keeping the toes on the floor; hold for 5 seconds and return the feet back flat to the floor. Repeat this toes/heels movement a few times.
  1. Feet 2: Lift one leg slightly off the floor while pointing your toes away from you. Now push the heels away from you. Hold each position 5 seconds and repeat for a total of 3 times. Then, circle the foot 3 times in one direction and 3 times in the opposite direction. Repeat the series of moves 3 times and then do the opposite leg.

Keeping things moving – whether it is stuff in the mental function or stuff in the physical function – is important. It is good to get things completed on the computer and feel good about cognitive results but remember to keep the old body moving too. Enjoy the series of movements. Cheers from down under, Mate.

 

Danielle Gault presented workshops in New Zealand at the National Reflexology Conference and some yoga workshops at The Life Centre in Nelson, New Zealand at the top of the South Island which is something like paradise.

Danielle Gault, writer, trainer, and natural healer, delivers workshops, coaching and healing services in Ontario, New York, and New Zealand. She has written articles published in the Ontario Association of Psychological Type, local newspapers, and for the Reflexology Association of Canada. Danielle believes in a holistic approach to living and uses personality theory, natural healing techniques such as yoga, reflexology and insightful workshops to assist people in addressing their issues in life and striving to live consciously. Her websites are: http://www.wellness-training-services.com and http://www.corporate-training-services.com or contact her at dgault@cwtservices.biz for workshops and reflexology services.

Article Source: EzineArticles.com

Dec 04

Liven Up Your Workout With Push Up Variations

For decades, maybe centuries, the push up has been the mainstay of the military’s workout regimes, and why not. It is a great exercise for chest, biceps, shoulders, and indirectly strengthens the core because of the position that is necessary to execute them properly. It is also a mainstay in circuit training, particularly bodyweight circuits. But what if you are not strong enough to do a standard push up? On the other hand, what if you have mastered the standard and wish to provide more difficulty? What if you are just plain bored with standard push ups? There are exercise variations. Variations allow you to modify the exercises to make them easier or more difficult. They also allow you to provide variety to your circuit training. Lets explore five different variations.

INCLINEDS are performed against a wall, on a chair, or a step where the head is higher than the feet. This variation is ideal for the person that is not quite ready for the standard push up and is working their way up to it. The head level can be adjusted lower and lower as the person gains strength until they are ready to perform a standard push up.

BENT KNEES are ideal for the person who is working their way up to a standard push up. They are also effective for people with lower back strain. Sometimes they are referred to as girl’s push ups. In any event, the knees are on the ground and are used as the fulcrum as the push up is performed. One excellent use for bent knee push ups is during supersets. Standard push ups are performed until exhaustion. Immediately, the knees are lowered to the ground and the participant continues with bent knee push ups until failure. This technique is very effective in building both muscle strength and endurance.

ELEVATEDS are performed by placing the feet above the level of the head, on a step, a chair or any other object. The raised feet not only cause a greater degree of difficulty but also work more of the upper chest due to the angle.

Performing ELEVATED AGAINST A WALL is an even more difficult version of the elevated exercise. Instead of the feet being placed on an elevated object, the feet are elevated above the head but placed against a wall. In order to successfully perform the exercise, the participant has to provide pressure towards the wall in addition to raising the chest causing even more pressure on the upper chest. As the feet are placed higher on the wall, the strain shifts toward the shoulders. I’ve added this technique to the earlier superset for a killer chest workout; elevated push ups against the wall to failure, followed by standard push ups to failure, followed by bent knee push ups to failure. That’ll pump your chest up!

SPIDERMAN STYLE is a challenging variation. When done correctly, they look like Spiderman climbing up a wall, but just on the floor. You’ll get upper-body and core work because you’ll be lifting a foot off the ground and alternate bringing each knee towards your head each time you lower yourself to the down position. There are plenty of videos on YouTube if you need a visual.

Finally, HINDUS are my favorite variation. I’m going to attempt to describe how to perform them but your best bet may be going to YouTube to watch it on video. A picture is worth a thousand words. First, get on all fours then put your behind in the air while supporting yourself on your hands and feet with your legs straight. Now you should like a triangle with your hands and feet at the base and your behind as the apex. This is the starting position. Your head should be aligned with your back facing towards your feet. Take a deep breath and then sweep down in a circular arc motion and bend back looking up at the ceiling and breathing out. From there, push back toward your heels into the triangle position and start over. Hindu push ups not only work the entire upper body, they provide a great stretch for the lower back. Again, there are plenty of YouTube videos of Hindu push ups.

To summarize, these exercise variations can be used to make circuits more or less difficult or to provide variety. If you can’t do standard push ups yet, you might want to do bent knees and inclines in the same circuit in order to build up your strength. If you are on the other end of the scale, you might want to use the elevated or the elevated wall method, or Spiderman style in your circuits. Experiment a little and find a combination that is beneficial to you.

 

If you want exercise advice feel free to email me at cdrgrimes@gmail.com or message me on Facebook. You can also see my exercise videos there. To get the secret of achieving and maintaining a healthy weight go to http://tinyurl.com/healthy60.

Clint Grimes, is a retired US Navy commander. He is certified by the California Interscholastic Federation and is currently the strength and conditioning coach for the boys soccer teams at El Toro High School in Lake Forest, CA.

Article Source: EzineArticles.com

Dec 02

Bodyweight Circuits – The Efficient, Effective, And Practical Way to Condition High School Athletes

I have been coaching soccer for 25 years from the NCAA Division I level on down to youths. In recent years, my coaching has been exclusively with youths and teenagers. I’ve also trained myself with the traditional isolation style weight lifting and traditional cardio for 30 years. I made the transition to bodyweight circuits myself and as a soon to be 50 year-old, I am in the best shape of my life, benching over 300 lbs, squatting over 500, and running 1.5 miles in 10:38.

A year ago, my older son started coaching high school wrestling. As a favor to him I have taken on strength training for high school wrestlers.

I’m here to tell you, having teenage boys in a weight room is a nightmare. It’s like herding cats! First there is the matter of weight room time in a high school of 3000 with many sports teams. Next you are dealing with supervising teenage boys, teaching them form, squelching malingering and horseplay, and dealing with plain old fashion safety. And recording progress and results? Forget about it! You’re talking about kids who can’t remember to bring a pencil to class!

Enter bodyweight circuits. This method of jockeying rapid-fire bodyweight exercises is the foolproof method that the military has used to condition recruits for decades. There is little or no equipment required. A step, curb, or chair is the most you’ll ever need. Their bodies are the fitness machines that supply the resistance. That means a wrestling room, gym floor, or open field will suffice. The growing popularity of bodyweight training has fitness center directors quaking.

Exercises are easy to teach, and easy to supervise. The simpler the exercise, the better. Everybody does the same thing at the same time. Some may argue that an athlete can’t get strong using their own body weight. Explain that to an Olympic gymnast who can press his entire body weight on unstable rings. Have your 200-pound football player who normally does 150- lb military presses attempt handstand push ups against a wall and you’ll get your answer.

What about cardio? Body weight circuits replace boring cardio workouts with endless exercise combinations and interval times, not to mention that they cut exercise time. Adding reps or modifying an exercise will add difficulty. An effective circuit workout is only 10-20 minutes long. That’s it! That leaves more time for teaching the important techniques and tactics of your sport.

One further benefit is fat loss. Let’s face it. All extra fat does for a wrestler is put him in a higher weight class with a stronger opponent. It keeps soccer players and basketball players earth-bound. Even football offensive linemen need to shed excess fat that limits their mobility and most importantly, increases health risks.

Instead of distance running or wind sprints, try this at your next practice:

Have your athletes line up in concentric semi-circles so that you can see them. Use a stopwatch or a countdown timer. Have them perform the exercises below in sequence continuously for 15 minutes. Don’t have them count. You count out the reps for them. They’ll need the wind for breathing. You control the cadence of each exercise, check for form, and provide encouragement. In a few short weeks your team will reap the results.

Here’s the workout:

  • 10 Burpees
  • 15 Jumping Jacks
  • 10 Push Ups (or Hindu Push Ups for greater difficulty)
  • 10 Mountain Climbers (or cross body mountain climbers for greater difficulty
  • 15 Squats (or Hindu squats for greater difficulty).

 

If you want exercise advice feel free to email me at cdrgrimes@gmail.com or message me on Facebook. You can also see my exercise videos there. To get the secret of achieving and maintaining a healthy weight go to http://tinyurl.com/healthy60.

Clint Grimes, is a retired US Navy commander. He is certified by the California Interscholastic Federation and is currently the strength and conditioning coach for the boys soccer teams at El Toro High School in Lake Forest, CA.

Article Source: EzineArticles.com

Nov 27

Best Leg Exercises for Fast Weight Loss

Introduction

The best way to induce fast weight loss is to engage in short burst exercises using multiple major muscle groups in a series of non-opposing exercises, often called a circuit. Leg strengthening exercises using multiple muscle groups in the legs should be the foundation of any circuit training program. Two exercises that fit this criteria superbly are lying hip extensions and step ups.

Performing Lying Hip Extentions

Lay down, face up with your hands at your sides, with one leg out straight and the other bent at a 45 degree angle. Raise your torso and hips off the ground as high as possible by driving the heel of your bent leg into the ground while keeping the opposite leg straight. Lower your torso to the ground then repeat using the same leg until reaching the desired number of repetition, then repeat with the opposite leg. This exercise is excellent for the entire quadriceps, especially the hamstrings, and all of the muscles in your behind.

Performing Step Ups

Step ups is a fantastic exercise that activates the muscles in your butt, your hamstrings as well as peripheral muscles of the calves and the Achilles tendon. The exercise can also be done with dumbells for extra resistance. It’s very important that the step is high enough to provide activation of the muscles above the knee.

Start in the standing position next to the step, or chair. Step up, placing your left foot on the step, lean forward and raise your body to the standing position on the bench. You should raise your body as rapidly as possible being careful not to hyper extend your knee at the top. Step down to the starting position with your right leg first. Continue to repeat the exercise, alternating legs, until you reach the desired nuber of repetitions.

Putting It All Together

Now that you know these two exercises, its your job to put them into a circuit training wokout in such a way to maimize the effectiveness of he circuit for fast weight loss. The best way to do this would be make sure that the exercises preceding and following each of these leg exercises is a non-opposing (upper body) exercise or a total body exercise. Make sure that your circuit has between six and ten exercises. Each exercise should have between ten and thirty repetitions. Depending how many exercises are in your circuit, you should repeat the series enough times so that the total number of sets is between twenty and thirty. There is an example below to get you started.

  • Step Ups 20 (10 per leg)
  • Burpees 10
  • High Knees 50
  • Jumping Jacks 60
  • Hindu Pushups 20
  • Lunges 20
  • Lying Hip Extensions 20 (10 per leg)
  • Elevated Push Ups 20
  • Three Rounds

 

If you want exercise advice feel free to email me at cdrgrimes@gmail.com or message me on Facebook. You can also see my exercise videos there. To get the secret of achieving and maintaining a healthy weight go to http://tinyurl.com/healthy60.

Clint Grimes, is a retired US Navy commander. He is certified by the California Interscholastic Federation and is currently the strength and conditioning coach for the boys soccer teams at El Toro High School in Lake Forest, CA.

Article Source: EzineArticles.com

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